Speak with us
+264 (0)61 258220
Send us an email
dappnamibia@iway.na

The DAPP Vocational Training School aims to equip students with essential vocational skills and attitudes that will help them to seek meaningful employment to sustain themselves and their families.The school also trains students in entrepreneurial skills so they can start their own income generating activities. At the same time the school includes broader training and activities that promote the engagement of the students in sports, culture and community development.

The DAPP Vocational Training School is accredited by Namibia Qualifications Authority (NQA) and is registered with the Namibian Training Authority, offering the following accredited courses:

  • Construction, one year for each Level 1,2,3
  • Office Administration, one year for each Level 1,2,3
  • Agriculture, one year for each Level 2.3
  • Early Childhood Development (ECD) Teaching, two-year course ending with diploma Level 5 

Learning practical skills
Agriculture
Brick production

Students receive theoretical and practical training according to approved unit standards. Furthermore, the students undertake job attachments at construction companies, offices, farms and agricultural green schemes, early childhood development centres and kindergartens.

The DAPP Vocational Training School appreciates financial support from the Namibia Training Authority as well as school fees from parents. Some of the students also receive study loans from the Namibia Student Financial Assistance Fund.

In 2017 the school's main results in numbers were:

  • 165 students were enrolled
  • 115 students graduated in vocational courses (55 with certificates and 60 with diplomas)

A special achievement was the graduation of 60 students with Level 5 Diplomas in Early Childhood Development (ECD) Teaching, that are in high demand.

What happens to the students after graduation?
A tracer study carried out among students who finished their training 1-3 years back showed that 68% were employed or self-employed, which is a fair result compared to the general unemployment rate among youth in the country.